Saturday Night Spectator!

Live closing night performance at FRIGID 2013:

 

http://youtu.be/Dn5lDwxiHYs

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Review from NYTheater.com

From Ed Malin:

The characters in this show are all very sexy for the way they helped give “light” to the blind during and after the Age of Enlightenment.

It starts with the host of the show, writer-director-costumer designer Dr. ML Godin, an obviously big-hearted scholar who is determined to bring this history to the people through an accessible “steam punk aesthetic”.  Ms. Godin introduces six monologists who, in a refreshingly real, non-period piece style which I find myself comparing to Schnitzler’s “La Ronde”, work off each other to document the years 1771-1829.  (read the rest of the review here)

Leave a comment

Filed under Press

Interview with Stagebuddy

Leave a comment

Filed under Press

Dr ML Godin talks about the upcoming Frigid NY festival!

Leave a comment

Filed under Press

New Promo Video!

Check out our new promo video, directed by Todd Jackson!

Leave a comment

Filed under Press

Painting Preview

I read about a spectacle in which ten blind men unskilled in playing their instruments scraped and banged on violins and cellos while dressed up in dunce caps and asses ears nearly a decade ago, but it was not until last September, while back home in CA, that I had an epiphany: what were those blind guys thinking?

I had always heard the story from the perspective of the man who would become the father of the blind – Valentin Haüy (Gregory Levine). Educated, snooty, and writing with the hindsight of success, he found the sideshow burlesque horrid. But seeing the scene from the perspective of the unknown blind performer (Bill Chambers), I thought the spectacle might have been the time of his life.

I read that first story “How I became a Cyclops” to my dear friend of many years Nellie King Solomon and she, a painter immediately started sketching out ideas for her next painting. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Visuals

Interview with NYTheater.com

08 Leona Lights

“I don’t enter a theater in order to make or experience societal change, but I wouldn’t have any impulse to enter or make theater if I didn’t think that was possible. The darkened room with fellow humans, the length of time granted, the attention required to absorb sight, sound, story and spectacle, contribute to the power of the theatrical experience, which should not be squandered. It can rock worlds!”

-read more from an interview with creator Dr ML Godin at NYTheatre.com.

Leave a comment

Filed under Press

Act Three: Revolution!

Story 5 Night-Writing – as told by Captain Charles Barbier, 1822

As a former captain in the French Revolution, Barbier  invented his system of raised dot letters in order to convey military intelligence that could be read in the dark. After the war he thought to bring his system to the school for the blind in Paris where little Louis Braille was a student.

Story 6 The Awl – as told by Louis Braille, 1829

He blinded himself at age three and began work on his writing system at age 13 after Barbier’s demonstration. But the school was now run by petty pedagogues who banned this new system as being distasteful. Braille must therefore teach his superior system under cover of dark and secrecy.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under The Stories and their Tellers

Act Two: Royal Countenance

Story 3 Mesmer & Me – as told by Maria Theresia von Paradis, 1784

The blind Viennese pianist has a dark past, imperial patronage and a splendid run in Paris in the spring of 1784. It is while she takes the Parisian salon set by storm that she meets Valentin Haüy and gives him the final push to open his school for the blind.

Story 4 Nothing Can Hurt Me Now – as told by Marie Antoinette, 1793

Born an Austrian princess, she would become the most infamous of all France’s queens. Haüy’s school for the blind flourishes in the last years of the reign of Louis XVI, climaxing in demonstration for the King and Queen at Versailles. Marie Antoinette reflects on this moment from under the guillotine.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under The Stories and their Tellers

Act One: The Café of the Blind

Story 1 How I Became a Cyclops – as told by an unnamed young man, 1771

An inmate of the hospice for the blind in Paris called the Hospice of the Quinze-Vingts, has been rounded up with his buddies by an enterprising showman (The Maestro) to participate in a spectacle. Things go awry!

Story 2 Letters for the Blind or Three Dead at Figaro – as told by Valentin Haüy, 1784

The man who would be known as the Father and Apostle of the blind reflects on the incident that prompted him to promise to “make the blind read” and why it is as yet unfulfilled.

Leave a comment

Filed under The Stories and their Tellers